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Thursday, January 2, 2014

WHAT IF I WAS AN ALIEN? by Victoria Pinder



Picture: Awkward teenage girl with huge glasses and thin hair that never did anything. Yep, that was me. And before I was swept away in a romance, add to the geeky scene pants that went to high, comic books before they were considered trendy, plaid shirts, and a father who enjoys science fiction enough to ‘recommend’ books too. This picture was those painful memories of my teenage years, but somehow now, I look back with approving eyes. It could have been a lot worse.
   So I read books where the usually male hero goes off and has some grand adventure while saving Earth, the known universe, or time as we know it. All fun reads. But as a female, the fiction world was male geared. My gender was an anomaly. When writing science fiction as a female, not everyone wants to write the aliens need women stories. I’ve been considered an alien in my viewpoint. An alien at her heart can never be human because she’s not one of us.

   So instead of writing about hot alien men, to me part of the fun is writing an alien through female eyes. For human audiences, she has to have something so basic about her that we relate to her. There is so much internal drama that can make the heroine stand out. For me, Ariel might steal other people’s bodies, but it’s more about her journey home. How far would anyone go to get home? The journey home is also a common science fiction theme.

   And what I love about romance novels is that despite the alls, I the reader invest in a good will triumph, happy ever after story. Vampires, werewolves, elves, witches, well they are all fun magical creatures. But to me venturing into the male dominated world where the readers and writers are often men means the female author has a unique story to tell. We’re not seeing the issue of ‘the story has been told before’ because the field is vast. Female aliens who are relatable are a wide open story. Leia in Star Wars is technically an alien woman to humans. She’s relatable. In fact, my fall back outfit every Halloween is my Princess Leia wig. If you enjoy aliens and stare up at the sky with the question, ‘what if’ then aliens aren’t just for boys anymore.

Blurb for The Zoastra Affair:

A hundred years from now, Earth has trading partners with alien beings, mostly humanoid. However, going into space brought forth an unknown enemy who attacks Earth at will.

The Zoastra is part of the Earthseekers, an organization originally designed to go into space. Its new mission is to find Earth’s enemies.

Ariel is stuck on a Victorian planet and steals Grace’s body and life to get off the planet. Grace must get her body back before Ariel bonds with Grace’s husband, Peter. Then there is Cross, the man on a mission to find those who killed his family. Ariel is attracted to Cross, but she’s stolen someone’s life.


The Zoastra Affair

by Victoria Pinder

Published by Soul Mate Publishing

Science Fiction Romance

Heat Level: Intimate

Length: 85000 words 

Available at:

Coming December 30th from Soul Mate Publishing.

About the Author:              


Victoria Pinder grew up in Irish Catholic Boston before moving to the Miami sun. She’s worked in engineering, after passing many tests proving how easy Math came to her. Then hating her life at the age of twenty four, she decided to go to law school. Four years later, after passing the bar and practicing very little, she realized that she hates the practice of law. She refused to one day turn 50 and realize she had nothing but her career and hours at a desk. After realizing she needed change, she became a high school teacher. Teaching is rewarding, but writing is a passion.

During all this time, she always wrote stories to entertain herself or calm down. Her parents are practical minded people demanding a job, and Victoria spent too many years living other people’s dreams, but when she sat down to see what skill she had that matched what she enjoyed doing, writing became so obvious. The middle school year book when someone wrote in it that one day she’d be a writer made sense when she turned thirty.

When she woke up to what she wanted, the dream of writing became so obvious. She dreams of writing professionally, where her barista can make her coffee and a walk on the beach, can motivate her tales. Contemporary romances are just fun to write. She’s always thinking whose getting hurt and whose story is next on the list to fall in love. Victoria’s love of writing has kept her centered and focused through her many phases, and she’s motivated to write many stories.

Member of Florida Romance Writers, Contemporary Romance, Fantasy, Futuristic and Paranormal chapter of RWA, and in Savvy Authors.
 

2 comments:

Dani Harper said...

Great post! I really relate to the nerdy larval stage, glasses and comic books and all! In fact, I relate to most of the article, because the sci-fi books I loved so much were indeed told from a guy's point of view. Small wonder I wasn't very interested in being a girl at the time...

VictoriaPinder said...

Dani, the sci fi novels are all male POV and yes, I had that 'why am I a girl' stage too.